What To Do When a Spill or Stain Occurs - FIRST CALL FIBERGUARD!

CAUTION: IF YOU ARE ABOUT TO ATTEMPT THE STEPS BELOW ON FABRIC OR UPHOLSTERY STOP AND CALL US! SOME FABRICS ARE NOT WET OR SOLVENT CLEANABLE AND PERMANENT DAMAGE WILL OCCUR! READ MANUFACTURERS INSTRUCTIONS AND/OR CALL FIBERGUARD BEFORE PROCEEDING!

Spots on Wool Carpet or Rugs

Since wool carpet fibers aren’t manufactured by a factory, finding a manufacturers recommendation for the fibers isn’t practical sense some wool fibers are used in wall to wall carpet while others may be used in area rugs…all dyed or processed using a variety of (sometimes localized) techniques. However, the WoolMark has recommended carpet spotting procedures at the link below for your review. We’d advise following their procedures prior to any procedures suggested by FiberGuard. http://www.woolmark.com/living.php?id=108

GENERAL SPOTTING SUGGESTIONS

1. Blot, wick, or scrape off any solid soil or staining material. Work gently so as not to force the soil or stain into the fibers. Abrasive action could result in a wear or abrasion to the fabric.

2. Fabric spotting chemicals should be used only after determining the cleaning “code” of the fabric which will tell you what type of chemical to use. For example, if the fabric is an “S” code fabric, they you would use a waterless solvent spotting agent. A “W” code would indicate a wet cleanable fabric and some fabrics are labeled both “W” and “S”. An “X” labeled code would indicate a vacuum only fabric.

3. Always pre-test the fabric in an inconspicuous area for colorfastness before proceeding with any cleaning procedure. Wait until the test area is thoroughly dry. Rings, shrinking and bleeding of colors may occur and would indicate that the fabric may not be cleanable with the cleaning agent you are testing. Additional testing be a professional may be recommended.

4. If the pre-testing is successful, apply the proper cleaning agent to a towel and then to the spot, blotting gently into a towel, and from the towel into the stain. (If necessary, dilute first as directed.) Blot gently with a dry towel and repeat as needed. When blotting, blot toward the center of the stain to help prevent spreading. Repeat as needed.

5. Rinse if directed. Place a dry towel over the spot, and weigh it down with a book after rinsing is completed, to absorb the excess solution. Wetting agents tend to “rise to the surface” as they dry, and will “pool” on the surface of the fibers with the stain if a dry towel isn’t waiting to absorb them.

6. If the spot does not come out repeat the steps above and/or move on the next step listed below. Some stains are effectively removed by repeating the sequence more than one time. Take your time…work for short periods. By allowing time for the affected area to dry, you will be able to judge the success of the cleaning.

Using these formulas you may be able to remove most spots or stains yourself. Remember it’s always better to speak to a competent cleaner, the supplier of the item that got stained and to always refer to the instructions that came with the item first.

Before using any of these formulas (A-G) remember to Never, Never, rub or twist fibers as permanent damage may result! Blot ONLY! Use clean, white terry towels and, after rinsing, make sure to place an absorbent towel on top of the spotted area and weight it down to allow for the stain to wick into – and out of – the stained item. ALWAYS PRE-TEST before proceeding!

A. Dry cleaning solvent such as Zeen, Carbona, or Energine.

B. One teaspoon of clear detergent to 2 cups water and 2 tablespoons of alcohol.

C. 1/3 Cup white vinegar and 1/3 cup water.

D. 1 Tablespoon plain ammonia and 1 cup of water.

E. Apply cool water and blot dry, at least twice.

F. Ice.

G. Vacuum. (Make sure not to vacuum up wet or solvent spotters or electrocution, explosion or permanent damage to equipment may result!)

We make no representation or claim of accuracy or effectiveness of these procedures. When available, use a professional to clean and protect furnishings that are valuable.

Find the staining agent and then follow the sequence to the right of the stain, using the formulas above, as directed:

Beverages

E

B

C

E

 

 

Blood

E

F

D

C

E

 

Cement, Glue

A

B

C

E

 

 

Chewing Gum

F

A

G

 

 

 

Coffee, Tea

B

C

E

 

 

 

Cosmetics

A

B

D

C

E

 

Crayon

A

B

D

C

E

 

Dye

A

B

D

C

E

 

Food Stains

A

B

D

C

E

 

Furniture Polish

A

B

D

C

E

 

Gravy, Grease

A

B

E

 

 

 

Ink

E

A

B

D

C

E

 

Medicine

A

B

D

C

E

 

Milk

E

A

B

E

C

E

 

Mud

G

E

B

C

 

 

Oil, Tar

A

B

D

E

 

 

Paint

A

B

D

E

 

 

Urine

E

B

C

E

 

 

Vomit

B

D

C

E

A

 

Water Rings

C

E

 

 

 

 



Minimizing Wear and Preventing Stains

  • Colors can be damaged by prolonged exposure to direct sunlight. Consider having a coating applied to your windows that can prevent damaging sunlight from affecting light sensitive fabrics.
  • Rotate furniture in the room from time to time to redistribute wear patterns.
  • Keep flowers and foliage on houseplants from contact or spillage on furnishings and be very careful with plant fertilizers that can also damage fabrics.
  • Rotate cushions and pillows regularly to equalize wear and tear.
  • Vacuum all furnishings weekly, at least, using crevice tools on furniture and carpet edges to remove abrasive soils, dust, etc.
  • Do not allow contact with newspapers or printed materials or new blue jeans that may bleed or rub (crock) ink onto furnishings.
  • Take special care with cigarettes, candles, drinks, medicines, foods and pets.
  • Keep clean white cloth napkins or terry cloth towels handle for fast blotting of spills before they have a chance to soak in.
  • Take care not to spill household cleaning agents meant to be used on non-fiber surfaces.
  • Cover or remove upholstered pieces when working with paint, bleach or pesticides in the home.
  • Clean professionally and hire only cleaning technicians trained according to IICUC standards.
  • When spot cleaning fabric whenever possible, unzip cushion and place an absorbent cloth between fabric and foam cushion.
  • Whenever possible, note the manufacturers cleaning instructions and keep handy for reference.
  • For tracked in solid or muddy soil, wait until it dries and then vacuum before attempting we cleaning.
  • Add traffic mats to entrances and make sure to clean and/or change them frequently.
  • Incorrect spotting procedures or chemicals can cause more problems than they correct.
  • Some fabrics cannot be cleaned with water without permanent damage, some cannot be spotted with solvent without causing damage and some fabrics are dry vacuumable only. PRE-TEST with your cleaning agents in an inconspicuous spot before proceeding.
  • Change filter/bag in vacuum and furnace regularly